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Posted on Aug 20, 2015

Fair-weather friends

Kallie Kooistra is more than a little bit country.
The 9-year-old brought five animals to the Grant County Fair this year, but that barely makes a dent into what this farm girl has back at the homestead.

Cricket and Promist, 1-year-old Nubian goats, watch with interest the crowd at the Grant County Fair. Photos by Kurtis J. Wood.

Cricket and Promist, 1-year-old Nubian goats, watch with interest the crowd at the Grant County Fair. Photos by Kurtis J. Wood.

Kooistra brought four goats and one pig, but also has upward of 20 chickens as well as horses at home. The 275-pound Hampshire pig is for sale, but definitely not the goats.
“I am not selling them,” she said. “(They are) going to have babies this year.”
She intends on breeding her goats. Right now she has a 4-year-old Nubian named Journey, which has a 6-month old baby named Feline (pronounced fu-leen).
“It’s her 4-H project which she will carry all the way through, “ said her mom Shannon Kooistra.
Young Kooistra seems to have a soft spot for Feline, who has spots like a deer.
“That’s why I named her off of (the movie) Bambi,” said Kooistra.
The other two are 1-year-old Nubians – Cricket and Promise.
Kooistra seems to have a good connection with Feline. After all, she has had her since she was born. She even watched the birth of the little goat. Kooistra enjoys playing with her animals.
“When she was a baby she used to walk on my back,” Kooistra said. “It hurt.”
While the four goats at the fair are not for sale, Feline’s two brothers were sold for $75 each. They were triplets and Kooistra chose to keep the smallest of the three.
She said one of the best things about the goats is that they are friendly.
She feeds them flakes twice a day. A flake is roughly 1/16 of a bale of hay.
“I feed them two flakes in the morning and two flakes at night,” Kooistra said.
To prepare the goats for the fair she shaved them, clipped them, fed them, played with them and walked them in pairs.
“It takes but 30 minutes for two goats, so about an hour,” Kooistra said. “(Walking them in pairs) helps, so they learn how to lead.”

— By Kurtis J. Wood, sports@qvpr.com

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