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Posted on Oct 5, 2017

News briefs, week of Sept. 28, 2017

Pumpkin patch, maze will return
The Quincy Valley Lions Club and Becerra Gardens will once again host the Harvest Maze and Pumpkin Patch, from Sept. 30 through Oct. 29, Saturdays and Sundays, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. The cost is $6 per person and includes a pumpkin, maze, games and activities. Special group rates and dates are available. There will be fire pits for roasting hotdogs and s’mores, and concessions will be available. Pumpkins may be purchased separately for $3 each. For more information, email quincyvalleylions@yahoo.com.

Seniors: Serving Salisbury steak
Last week’s game winners were: pinochle – Ruth Atwood and Carol Michael; Rummikub – Larry Kniveton and Faye Burton; dominoes – Susan Lacy and Vaughn Vordahl; and bridge – Loraine Greenwalt and Aldene Duchscherer.
Thursday is Salisbury steak, baked spuds, salad, rolls, roasted veggies and apple crisp with ice cream. Dinner is served at 6 p.m. Prices are $7 for members, $8 for nonmembers age 50-plus, and $9 for under age 50.
Friday leftover-lunch is served at 11:30 a.m. Monday is Italian veggie soup, turkey sandwich, pasta salad and chocolate crinkle cookie. Tuesday is breakfast casserole, pumpkin-cream cheese muffin and fruit or BLT and oatmeal cookie. Wednesday is cheeseburger, French fries, coleslaw and pumpkin bars. Lunch is served at 11:30 a.m. and is $5 for members, $6 for nonmembers age 50-plus, $7 for under age 50, with a $1 charge for to-go orders. Senior citizens may have lunches delivered Monday through Thursday inside Quincy city limits for an additional $2, call 787-3231.
Weekly activities include Monday – TOPS at 4 p.m.; Tuesday – coffee hour at 10 a.m. and SAIL class at 2 p.m.; Wednesday – bridge at 12:30 p.m., Chat and Stitch at 1 p.m.; Thursday – SAIL class at 2 p.m., dinner at 6 p.m., followed by games at 6:30 p.m. See the ad for the Pancake Breakfast and classified ad for AARP Safe Driving class.
The center is open to all seniors 50 years and older, membership is $20 a year or $200 for lifetime. The office is open 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Monday through Friday.

Yappy Hour Parade
Two Doors Down is sponsoring the Yappy Hour Parade on S. Central Ave on Saturday, September 30 from 1-3 p.m. at the 300 block of S. Central Ave. Admittance is by donation (monetary or pet supplies) and will go the the Quincy Animal Shelter. Pre-registration is encouraged at Two Doors Down or the Quincy Animal Shelter prior to Sept. 30 at 12:30 p.m. on day of event. There will be games, prizes, a dog parade and a costume contest.
Wine industry offers scholarships
The Washington Wine Industry Foundation opened its scholarship application process and set a deadline for March 31, 2018.
This year more than $30,000 in scholarships is being offered to students pursuing certificates, undergraduate or post-graduate degrees in viticulture, enology or wine-related disciplines.
The foundation says it has given 170 scholarships totaling $225,000 for education in the grape and wine industry since 2008. The foundation manages scholarships for the industry in alignment with its mission to bring together partners and facilitate funding to craft sustainable solutions to industry challenges.
Find an application at http://washingtonwinefoundation.org/scholarships/.

WSDOT opens comment period
Washingtonians have an opportunity to provide input on the future of the state’s transportation system through the Washington Transportation Plan, Phase 2 – Implementation.
The Washington State Department of Transportation is seeking public comments on the plan through Nov. 6.
The plan builds on WTP Phase 1, which established a 20-year vision for the statewide multimodal transportation system. WTP Phase 2 implements recommendations from Phase 1 through four focus areas and 11 action items to achieve the 20-year vision established in Phase 1. It also establishes how the state can prepare itself for four plausible, but uncertain futures regarding climate change and technology and their potential impacts on the statewide transportation system. Through its proposed recommendations, Phase 2 will guide decision makers on major issues facing the statewide transportation system.
Copies of the plan and a comment form are available at https://washtransplan.com/; by request at 206-464-1261 or Washington State Department of Transportation, Multimodal Planning Division, 401 Second Ave., Suite 300, Seattle, WA, 98104.

Veterans open essay, art contests for students
The local Veterans of Foreign Wars Post has announced four contests for local children.
The Voice of Democracy patriotic audio essay contest is open to students in grades 9-12 and offers prizes and a grand prize that includes a $30,000 scholarship. The contest theme is “American History: Our Hope for the Future.”
The Patriot’s Pen essay writing contest is open to students in grades 6-8 and offers cash awards. The contest theme is “America’s Gift to My Generation.” The deadline for both contests is Oct. 31.
The third essay contest is for students in grades 3-5 and has a theme of “What Does a Veteran Mean to Me?” The deadline for entries is Nov. 1.
An art contest is open to students from kindergarten through 12th grade. The theme is “What a Veteran Means to Me.” The deadline for entries is Oct. 1.
Information and entry forms for the four contests are available at the office of the Post-Register, 305 Central Ave. S. Entries are accepted in boxes at the Post-Register and at the Quincy Senior Center, 522 F St. SE.
For more information, contact Mark Owens, 750-0938, or email youthscholarships@vfw.org or go to www.vfw.org.

Mended Hearts chapter sets meeting
Greater Wenatchee Mended Hearts Chapter 91 meeting is scheduled for 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., Oct. 2, at Central Washington Hospital, conference rooms F and G, on the ground floor. The public is invited to come and learn about “Peripheral Artery Disease and Varicose Veins,” by Dr. Rachael Lundgren, vascular surgeon, at Confluence Health. For more information, contact Ann Diede at 509-679-8181 or mendedhearts91@frontier.com.

Wine growers organize convention
The Washington Winegrowers Association set the 2018 convention and trade show for Feb. 6-8 at the Three Rivers Convention Center in Kennewick with the theme of “Washington Wine: By Design.”
Washington’s wine industry boasts an influential $4.8 billion impact, due in large part to a concerted effort on education, advocacy and networking that helps create pathways to optimize business for vintners and winegrowers.
The Washington Winegrowers Convention and Trade Show offers small and large operations opportunities to learn and connect. Subject matter experts from industry and academia share insights and address issues in 15 diverse education sessions covering viticulture, enology, business operations, marketing and tasting room operations. Nearly 200 trade show booths give attendees access to service and supply providers with answers to questions and the latest in technology.
Events including an Honor Luncheon and Leadership Luncheon offer a chance to celebrate industry legends and leaders, sample Washington’s fine wines and network while learning.
Registration opens in November.

Panel on geographic names seeks comments
The Washington State Committee on Geographic Names will meet on Oct. 31 to consider proposed name changes for several geographic features in the state. Proposals receiving the committee’s approval will advance to the Board of Natural Resources, acting as the Washington State Board on Geographic Names, for a final decision.
The all-volunteer committee seeks public comment on the following proposals:
Houle Creek in Kittitas County: The proposed name is intended to honor the French trappers and traders of the Hudson’s Bay Company, who were among the first Europeans in the area.
Swaram Creek in Okanogan County: This proposal would replace the name of Squaw Creek with “Swaram,” which the proponent says is a word from the Methow language that describes the type of fishing once traditionally practiced at the creek.
Steffen Creek in Snohomish County: The proposed name would commemorate Herman Steffen, who purchased property near the creek in 1900 and whose descendants still operate Steffen Farms and own water rights to the creek.
Libby Creek in Thurston County: This proposal would commemorate the Libby family that homesteaded along the trail that is now Libby Road.
Comments on these proposals may be made at the Oct. 31 meeting or submitted no later than 5 p.m., Monday, Oct. 16, to bogn@dnr.wa.gov or to: Washington State Committee on Geographic Names, P.O. Box 47030, Olympia, WA, 98504-7030.

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