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Posted on Jun 17, 2016

Quincy boy named Chief for a Day

The new police chief of Quincy has his eye on someone.
In fact, the first thing he’s going to do is arrest him, said Chief Carsen Joslin, who took his oath of office last week.
“I want to arrest my brother,” said the 7-year-old first-grader, smiling at his older sibling.
Carsen was among a dozen children who received the honor of Chief for a Day at a ceremony on June 9 on the lawn of the Grant County Courthouse.

Officer Matt Harum of the Moses Lake Police Department escorts Carsen Joslin, 7, of Quincy to the Chief for a Day ceremony June 9 on the lawn of the Grant County Courthouse. Photo by Jill FitzSimmons.

Officer Matt Harum of the Moses Lake Police Department escorts Carsen Joslin, 7, of Quincy to the Chief for a Day ceremony June 9 on the lawn of the Grant County Courthouse. Photo by Jill FitzSimmons.

The 15th Annual Chief for a Day event shines a spotlight on children in local communities who have endured and overcome significant physical or developmental challenges, honoring them by making them the chief of a local law enforcement or fire department for the day.
In Carsen’s case, at 2 years old the otherwise healthy toddler developed a debilitating infection in his brain. He spent 40 days in the hospital, said his mother, Nicole Joslin. When he was released, he had to relearn how to sit up, crawl, walk, speak and more.
Sitting through the Chief for a Day ceremony brought back memories of those difficult days and the realization of just how far Carsen has come, Nicole said.
“It was actually a little more emotional than I thought it would be,” she said.
Today, Carsen, who attends Pioneer Elementary School, is like any other first-grader.
“He finds happiness in anything,” Nicole said.
The Chiefs for a Day represented nine law enforcement agencies and three fire departments from around the area. The children, wearing authentic (albeit smaller) uniforms from the agencies they represented, rode up to the courthouse in patrol cars and fire trucks. They were escorted to a tent on the courthouse lawn, where their families waited. Each was introduced to the crowd by a representative of their agency.
Quincy Police Chief Bob Heimbach told the crowd Carsen was excited at the chance to wear his uniform to school.
“And I suspect there were probably lots of violations handed out in the hallways,” Heimbach said.
Carsen enjoys playing soccer and baseball and riding on his grandfather’s Harley motorcycle. In fact, he especially enjoyed seeing the motorcycles from the various law enforcement agencies.

The Chiefs for a Day took their oaths before their family and friends.

The Chiefs for a Day took their oaths before their family and friends.

In Quincy, the little chief will attend various events this year, including the opening of the city’s new police department later this summer. He also will be at the Quincy City Council meeting on Tuesday to be recognized there.
“He’s going to be a busy, busy young man,” Heimbach said of his new partner.
Her son had been counting down the days to the ceremony, Nicole said, and he’s been sharing the news of his new title with many people.
“Anybody who will listen to him, he will tell,” she said
After the ceremony, Carsen said he especially enjoyed riding in a police car and turning on the sirens. And his uniform.
“I like the badge,” he said.

 

— By Jill FitzSimmons, editor@qvpr.com

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