Pages Menu

Community news for the Quincy, Washington, area since 1949

Categories Menu

Community

Kudos, Monument Elementary

Posted by on Nov 12, 2019

Monument Elementary School in Quincy announced its student winners of Character Trait Awards for September and October. September awards, for kindness Kindergarten: Alani Hernandez, Lilly Parsons, Keyra Rosas, Mateo Valverde First grade: Paisley Hernandez, Ulyses Mora, Paisley Johnson, Rylee Compton Second grade: Abby Gomez, Jeroham Sanchez, Ariadna Delgade-Godinez, Christian Varela Third grade: Dianara Zavalza, Kenzie Spence, Brooklyn Martin, Rey Ramirez-Valdez Fourth grade: Kayden Baughman, Daniela Esparza, Natalie Serrano, Izaiah Urquieta Fifth grade: Alyson Ferrerya, Addison Compton, Irvin Gomez, Alyson Ferreyra, Jayden Ortiz October awards, for honesty Kindergarten: Rayginn Baughman, Alejandro Marin Diaz, Jesus Arellano, Yohali Armas First grade: Diamond Rubio, Alyzaeh Oliva, Daniel Westra, Gunner Wilson Second grade: Diego Salazar Cruz, Gabby Bergman, Arlene Garcia, Oscar Martin Third grade: Miriam Calderilla-Luna, Julian (Alex) Torres, Jorge Escalera, Jennifer Gaona Fourth grade: Mikayla Wells, Jeremih Salazar, Noe Sanabria, Esmeralda Madrigal Fifth grade: Ruby Gonzalez-Martinez, Yadirah Pulido-Bravo, Tyler Mandeville, Vanessa...

read more

Scout helps make shelter dogs more comfortable

Posted by on Nov 11, 2019

With colder weather looming in the coming months, Quincy High School senior Gavin Porter decided to help animals in the Quincy Animal Shelter by donating 30 new dog beds for the number of dogs housed there. He donated the beds in early September, said Porter, who decided to take on the project to fulfill requirements to become an Eagle Scout, which he expects to receive in March. The Eagle Scout project is a leadership exercise focused on community service projects, he said. Porter is part of Troop 41 based in Ephrata. Porter also comes from a house full of animals: three dogs, three cats and a lizard, he said, adding that it’s kind of like a zoo. Beyond earning his Eagle Scout, Porter just wanted to help the dogs in the shelter be more comfortable in the winter months. “I wanted to help the animals before winter hit, so they didn’t have to sleep on cold, concrete ground,” said Porter. The beds are made of a PVC pipe frame with fabric stretched over it and screwed in. With help from his Scout troop and his brother Korbin, a freshman, all 30 beds were completed in two days, said Gavin. The group made three different sizes and 10 of each. The fabric screwed into the frames is very taught, elevating the animal off the floor, said Shelter Manager Issela Navarro. Some dogs are not allowed the beds because they will chew them up, but the dogs that do sleep on them do so in different ways. Some prefer to nap on just the fabric alone while others like a blanket on top of the fabric, said Navarro. “Having a bed will at least help so they don’t actually have to sleep on the cold [floor],” said Navarro said. “They’re durable, so it’s kind of hard for the dogs to rip up that easy.” By Miles King,...

read more

Looking Back, Nov. 10, 1966

Posted by on Nov 9, 2019

Looking Back, Nov. 10, 1966: City will try new chemicals in sewer lagoons Don Grey, city engineer, reported at the regular town council meeting Monday evening that chemicals will be tried on an experimental basis to help eliminate obnoxious odors from the lagoons in the West Industrial Sewer System. He stated that odors from the lagoons themselves have been practically eliminated from natural action, but some odors are coming from transfer boxes between the lagoons. The chemical deodorant will be deposited into the boxes in small amounts. The chemical is expensive, but only a few drops an hour are needed to relieve the problem. This chemical will be released into the system by an automatic machine. Council members approved an installation of a new control panel at the lift station of the East Industrial Sewer system which will prevent future trouble in the operation. This new control system cost $700. A study is being made on the need for a new city well for both industrial and residential use. This new well will be needed if additional industry is established here. Members of the council were informed that a firm was investigating the possibility of establishing a juicing plant for grapes in Quincy, and potential sites were being considered. Mayor Homer Reynolds urged all industries, businesses and residents to participate in the fall cleanup campaign, which is now underway. He requested the city attorney to draft an ordinance that would allow the town employees to clean up lots that were not being taken care of and the cost charged to the owners. Fire Chief Don Simmons was given authorization by the council to purchase a mobile radio unit for the department’s emergency vehicle and other firefighting equipment urgently...

read more

News briefs, week of Nov. 6, 2019

Posted by on Nov 6, 2019

Veterans plan parade, luncheon Art Semro Post and Unit 28 are proud to host the 22nd Annual Veterans Day Parade followed by a luncheon on Nov. 11. All organizations and individuals wishing to honor veterans are invited to attend. To participate in the parade, call Mike Montaney at 509-989-4417. The parade will assemble at 10:30 a.m. in front of the Grant County Courthouse and will step off at approximately 10:45 a.m. Afterward. parade participants and veterans in the area are invited to the Post home, 276 Eighth Ave. NW, Ephrata, for a luncheon hosted by the American Legion Auxiliary, Unit 28. Bunco night returns Bunco will be held from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m., Tuesday, Nov. 12, at Quincy Senior Center. The cost is $10, and everyone is welcome. Senior Center: Serving Cuban sandwiches Last week’s game winners at Quincy Senior Center were: pinochle – Nick Todd and Judy Todd; Rummikub – Ruth Minor and Larry Kniveton; bridge – Nancy Street and Jenny Hayes; and dominoes – Vaughn Vordahl and Mark Owens. Wednesday’s lunch is Cuban sandwich, rice, beans and shortbread cookie. Thursday dinner is chicken Parmesan atop noodles, glazed carrots, rolls, green salad and chocolate cake. Monday – the center is closed for Veterans Day. Tuesday lunch is breakfast burrito and fruit. Dinner is served at 6 p.m. Prices are $10 for members and $11 for nonmembers. Lunch is served from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. and is $5 for members, $6 for nonmembers, with a $1 charge for to-go orders. Senior citizens may have lunches delivered Monday through Wednesday inside Quincy city limits for an additional $2; call 787-3231. City offers varied activities For more information on Quincy Recreation Department activities, call 509-787-3523, ext. 9, or go to www.quincywashington.us. Upcoming activities include the following. STEM Family Nights are on the first Thursday of the month through May 2020. The activities begin at 5:30 p.m., with the next one, on Nov. 7, being building bridges. Girls basketball signups will be taken online at www.LittleLadyJacks.com. This new basketball program for girls in grades 1-8 replaces the city’s recreational basketball with Ephrata. For more information, call Jeremy McCreary at 509-797-1425, or Mike Thorsen at 509-699-1258, or for help in Spanish, Johan at 509-289-8932. Conference Week Day Camp will be held noon to 5 p.m., Nov. 5-8, at Quincy Activity Center. This camp is for ages 5 to 13, and the cost is $25 for all four days. A monthly handcraft club for knitters, crocheters, cross stitchers and artists will meet on Tuesdays to Dec. 17, from 10 to 11:30 a.m. at the Quincy Activity Center, 105 Second Ave. SE. All ages and skill levels are welcome. Knitting and crocheting patterns will be available, but bring your own materials. Quincy library prepares fun activities Quincy Public Library, 208 Central Ave. S., 787-2359, offers programs at no charge, including the following. Nov. 6, Beginner’s Minecraft, 3:30-5 p.m.; sign-up is required ahead of time. Nov. 7, Preschool Story Time & Craft, 10:30 a.m. Nov. 7, Bilingual Family Story Time & Craft, 4 p.m. Nov. 8, Movie Day, 1-3 p.m.; (early release from school) A newly released kids movie. Visit www.ncrl.org/locations/quincy-public-library to learn the title of the movie. Nov. 9, Creative Coloring, 1-3 p.m. Nov. 11, closed for the holiday. Nov. 12, Minecraft Session, 3:30-5...

read more

Lace maker impresses at Senior Center

Posted by on Nov 5, 2019

About a dozen ladies met in the Quincy Senior Center on the afternoon of Wednesday, Oct. 23, to witness the fine craftsmanship of bobbin lace maker Lone Black Eagle. Lone Black Eagle comes from Ephrata but was raised in Vancouver, Washington, where he learned the skill. He has been making lace for nearly 40 years, he said. “You work the bobbin, don’t let the bobbin work you,” Lone Black Eagle recalled his mentor saying. Lone Black Eagle makes the lace on a small pillowed platform with a pin cushion in the center. He worked Egyptian cotton thread through about a dozen pins in the cushion, weaving through them with the threads attached to about 15 bobbins. According to Lone Black Eagle, there are only two true laces in the world; bobbin and needle made lace. He takes about three to four hours to make a foot of lace using the bobbins, he said. He sells the lace for about $25 per foot. “A lot of people don’t want to pay the money for it,” he said, adding that the product doesn’t lose its value. By Miles King,...

read more

Looking Back, Oct. 31, 2002

Posted by on Oct 31, 2019

Looking Back, Oct. 31, 2002: McTeacher’s Night draws 16 educators Mountain View Elementary School raised over $450 at the local Quincy McDonald’s restaurant during McDonald’s second annual McTeacher’s Night fundraiser on Wednesday, Oct. 23. According to Quincy McDonald’s owner/operator Brett Adams, 15 percent of all sales between 4:30-7:30 p.m. were donated to Mountain View. Principal Carole Carlton and 15 teachers “worked” at McDonald’s greeting customers, working the registers and assisting in food preparation. Students and their families and school supporters visited McDonalds’s that night to help raise money for Mountain View and to see their teachers behind the counter. “Making sandwiches isn’t as easy as it looks!” said Gretchen Cedergreen, a first-grade teacher from Mountain View. Carlton said she had a wonderful time and was glad to see everyone come out to support Mountain View. Carlton said she had a wonderful time and was glad to see everyone come out to support Mountain View. The money raised will go into the Parent Volunteer Committee fund. The committee will then decide how to best use the money, combining it with other money to fund bigger projects. Right now, possible uses being discussed are technology or books in the classrooms, said Carlton. “We are delighted to work with our local schools again on this special evening to collectively raise money for education on behalf of McDonald’s,” said Arnes. “Last year’s McTeacher Night benefited Pioneer Elementary and we hope to continue raising funds for local...

read more

News briefs, week of Oct. 30, 2019

Posted by on Oct 30, 2019

City offers varied activities For more information on Quincy Recreation Department activities, call 509-787-3523, ext. 9, or go to www.quincywashington.us. Upcoming activities include the following. STEM Family Nights are on the first Thursday of the month through May 2020. The activities begin at 5:30 p.m., with the next one, on Nov. 7, being building bridges. Girls basketball signups will be taken online at www.LittleLadyJacks.com. This new basketball program for girls in grades 1-8 replaces the city’s recreational basketball with Ephrata. For more information, call Jeremy McCreary at 509-797-1425, or Mike Thorsen at 509-699-1258, or for help in Spanish, Johan at 509-289-8932. Conference Week Day Camp will be held noon to 5 p.m., Nov. 5-8, at Quincy Activity Center. This camp is for ages 5 to 13, and the cost is $25 for all four days. A monthly handcraft club for knitters, crocheters, cross stitchers and artists will meet on Tuesdays to Dec. 17, from 10 to 11:30 a.m. at the Quincy Activity Center, 105 Second Ave. SE. All ages and skill levels are welcome. Knitting and crocheting patterns will be available, but bring your own materials. Senior Center: Serving cheeseburgers Last week’s game winners at Quincy Senior Center were: pinochle – Betty Seader and Judy Todd; bridge – Peggy Emtman and Carol Michael; and dominoes – Vaughn Vordahl and Bonita Vordahl. Wednesday’s lunch is cheeseburger, French fries and peanut butter chocolate chip cookie. Thursday dinner is mummy meatloaf, spooky salad, rolls and carrot cake. Monday lunch is vegetable beef soup, apple muffin and double chocolate chip cookie. Tuesday lunch is waffles, scrambled eggs, bacon and fruit. Dinner is served at 6 p.m. Prices are $10 for members and $11 for nonmembers. Lunch is served from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. and is $5 for members, $6 for nonmembers, with a $1 charge for to-go orders. Senior citizens may have lunches delivered Monday through Wednesday in-side Quincy city limits for an additional $2; call 787-3231. Weekly activities include Monday – TOPS at 4 p.m.; Tuesday – coffee hour at 10 a.m. and SAIL class at 2 p.m.; Wednesday – bridge at 12:30 p.m., Chat and Stitch at 1 p.m.; Thursday – SAIL class at 2 p.m., dinner at 6 p.m., followed by games at 6:30 p.m. The center is open to all seniors 50 years and older, membership is $20 a year or $200 for lifetime. The office is open 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Monday through Thursday. Library begins November activities Quincy Public Library, 208 Central Ave. S., 787-2359, offers programs at no charge, including the following. Oct. 30, Simple Powered Lego Machines, 3:30-5 p.m. Oct. 31, Preschool Story Time & Craft, 10:30 a.m. Nov. 1, Keva Planks & Mazes, 3:30-5 p.m. Nov. 2, Fun with Games, 1-3 p.m. Nov. 4, Adult Scrabble Club, 10 a.m. Nov. 4, ATLAS At The Library After School, 3:30-5 p.m. Nov. 5, Minecraft Session, 3:30-5 p.m.; signup is required ahead of time. Nov. 6, Beginner’s Minecraft, 3:30-5 p.m.; sign-up is required ahead of time. Nov. 7, Preschool Story Time & Craft, 10:30 a.m. Nov. 7, Bilingual Family Story Time & Craft, 4 p.m. Nov. 8, Movie Day, 1-3 p.m.; (early release from school) A newly released kids movie. Visit www.ncrl.org/locations/quincy-public-library to learn the title of the movie. Nov. 9, Creative Coloring, 1-3 p.m....

read more

News briefs, week of Oct. 23, 2019

Posted by on Oct 24, 2019

Ghosts, goblins can collect Halloween treats Downtown trick-or-treating will return on Halloween, Oct. 31, 4 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. with the support of Quincy Valley Chamber of Commerce and local business people. Vehicles will be blocked from the streets in downtown Quincy during the free trick-or-treating event. Halloween party open to families A family fun Halloween party is planned at Quincy First Assembly, 526 H St. SE, on Oct. 31. The event includes free dinner, candy, a bouncy house, games and a grand prize drawing. Free food distribution planned A Second Harvest Mobile Market free food distribution will be offered from noon to 2 p.m., Tuesday, Nov. 12, at the Iglesia Metodista Libre el Jardin, at 815 Second Ave. SW, Quincy. Free produce and nutritious perishable products will be offered, with support from Dell EMC, for anyone in need of food assistance. No appointment or documentation is needed, but bring your own box or bag. For questions, contact info@2-harvest.org. Take-back event aims to reduce drug misuse The Quincy Police Department and Quincy Partnership for Youth will host a prescription drug take-back event on Oct. 26, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., at the Quincy Police Station, 223 First Ave. SW. This event is for the public to dispose of unused or expired prescription medication in a safe and easy way. Any prescription or over-the-counter medication is accepted. Medications can remain in their original containers and labels do not need to be removed. Medications not in their original containers will be accepted too. This take-back event helps support two campaigns from the Washington State Health Care Authority, called “Starts with One” and “Take Back Your Meds,” according to a press release. These campaigns inform and educate young adults, their parents, and older adults about the dangers of prescription drug misuse and the importance of safe storage, use, and disposal. According to the campaign website, “75 percent of opioid misuse starts with people using medication that wasn’t prescribed for them — usually taken from a friend or family member,” according to a press release. Simple steps, like safely disposing of medications, can stop them from being misused. Senior Center fundraiser set A fundraiser breakfast for the Quincy Senior Center is planned for 8 a.m. to noon, Oct. 26, at L&R Café, 1114 Central Ave. S, Quincy. The cost is $10 for ages 12 to senior, and $5 for seniors and children under 12. The breakfast will consist of pancakes, two sausage links, orange juice and coffee. Musical trio to perform Humanities Washington Speakers Bureau has a musical trio performance scheduled for Sunday, Oct. 27, 4-5:30 p.m., at Quincy Valley Historical Society & Museum. “Songs of Social Change” is the title for the event, presented by Trillium-239, an acoustic trio based in Richland and made up of Michelle Cam-eron cello, Janet Humphrey on guitar, and Mary Hartman on guitar and banjo. Formerly known as Humphrey, Hartman & Cameron, the trio has played at concerts, coffeehouses and festivals through-out the Northwest. Trillium-239 shares stories and songs of working life in the Northwest, beginning with American settlement of the West and ending with modern high-tech industries. Senior Center: Serving chicken salad Last week’s game winners at Quincy Senior Center were: pinochle – Wilma DeLeeuw and Nick Todd; Rummikub – Ruth Minor and Pam Barrow;...

read more

Looking Back, Oct. 23, 1986

Posted by on Oct 24, 2019

Looking Back, Oct. 23, 1986: Conference examines many ways to fight drug abuse Three Quincy students, one school district teacher and the head of the Quincy Chemical People chapter, attended the fifth annual “Building A Vision” conference on fighting drug and alcohol abuse, last weekend at Central Washington University. Corrine Koopman, chairman of the Chemical People, Chris Avey, Kim Howe and Julie Hoerch attended. Pat Avey, a teacher at George Elementary School, attended in her role as a member of the Grant County Coalition Task Force against substance abuse. The conference was sponsored by the Washington State Substance Abuse Coalition. A goal of the conference was to highlight special drug awareness projects done in communities across the state, Pat Avey said. Another was to emphasize the importance of involving young people and making clear the responsibility other members of their communities have in cracking down on drug abuse. Adults and youth attended different workshops on programs designed to fight drug abuse. They also heard about such tragedies as teenage suicide. One speaker stated that 90 percent of all crimes are in some way related to drugs or alcohol, Avey said. One seminar, titles, “Does Mass Media Affect Adolescent Drug Abuse? What Can a Parent Do?”, was led by Susan Kendall Newman, director of the Scott Newman Center in Pasadena, Calif. Susan Newman is the daughter of actor Paul Newman. Chris Newman was Newman’s son. He died of a drug overdose. Attendance by Chris Avey, a student of Quincy Junior High School; Howe and Hoersch, students at Quincy High School; and Pat Avey were sponsored by the Grant County Coalition Task Force. Koopman was sponsored by the Quincy Chemical...

read more

News briefs, week of Oct. 16, 2019

Posted by on Oct 16, 2019

Choirs to perform at QHS Two middle school choirs and two high school choirs will be featured in a concert at 7 p.m., Wednesday, Oct. 23, in the new Quincy High School Performing Arts Center. It is slated to be the first-ever concert in the brand-new theater. The concert is free, but donations are gladly accepted, and coupon cards (QHS Choir fundraiser) will be on sale for $20 as well. Emma Hanson, playing Anna, sings during the afternoon show of “Frozen Jr.” in the Performing Arts Center at Quincy Middle School on Saturday, Oct. 12. The PAC was nearly filled to capacity for the 4 p.m. showing by Quincy Valley Allied Arts. The play was produced almost entirely by youth 18 and under. Only about six adults were involved in the production, said director Marie Jamison.Photo by Miles King/Post-Register Quincy library prepares activities Quincy Public Library, 208 Central Ave. S., 787-2359, offers programs at no charge, including the following. Oct. 16, Adult Coloring & Chick Flick Movie, 1-3 p.m. Oct. 17, Preschool Story Time & Craft, 10:30 a.m. Oct. 17, Bilingual Family Story Time & Craft, 4 p.m. Oct. 18, Fun with Origami, 3:30-4:30 p.m. Oct. 19, Family Story Time & Craft, 10:30 a.m. Oct. 21, Adult Scrabble Club, 10 a.m. Oct. 21, ATLAS, At The Library After School, 3:30-5 p.m. Oct. 22, Minecraft Session, 3:30-5 p.m. Sign-up is required ahead of time. Oct. 23, Halloween Slime, 3:30-4:30 p.m. While supplies last; space is limited. Oct. 24, Preschool Story Time & Craft, 10:30 a.m. Oct. 24, Fun with Perler Fusion Beads, 3:30-5 p.m. Oct. 25, Movie Day, 3:30-5:30 p.m.; newly released kids movie. Visit www.ncrl.org/locations/quincy-public-library for the title of the movie. Oct. 26, Playing with Sphero Robots, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Senior Center: Serving French dip Last week’s game winners at Quincy Senior Center were: pinochle – Betty Seader and Judy Todd; Rummikub – Ruth Minor and Vaughn Vordahl; and bridge – Bev McDonald and Carol Michael. Wednesday’s lunch is French dip, green salad and oatmeal raisin cookie. Thursday dinner is beef enchiladas, Mexican rice, green salad and chocolate cake. Monday lunch is chicken noodle soup, rolls, green salad and peanut butter cookie. Tuesday lunch is biscuits and sausage gravy, scrambled eggs and fruit. Dinner is served at 6 p.m. Prices are $10 for members and $11 for nonmembers. Lunch is served from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. and is $5 for members, $6 for nonmembers, with a $1 charge for to-go orders. Senior citizens may have lunches delivered Monday through Wednesday inside Quincy city limits for an additional $2; call 787-3231. Weekly activities include Monday – TOPS at 4 p.m.; Tuesday – coffee hour at 10 a.m. and SAIL class at 2 p.m.; Wednesday – bridge at 12:30 p.m., Chat and Stitch at 1 p.m.; Thursday – SAIL class at 2 p.m., dinner at 6 p.m., followed by games at 6:30 p.m. Blood drive ahead The next Red Cross blood drive in Quincy will be 1 to 6 p.m., Oct. 22, at Quincy Valley Business & Conference Center. Red Cross urgently seeks donations of all blood types to give blood in support of kids fighting cancer, patients with sickle cell disease and others facing serious illnesses. Type O blood donors are urgently needed. To sign up, go to RedCrossBlood.org. Recreation...

read more