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Tony Mora Sr. tournament reaches 30th year

Posted by on Jun 13, 2019

Summer begins in Quincy this year with the 30th annual Tony Mora Sr. Softball Tournament. The 14-team tournament is June 22-23 in Quincy city parks – one field at East Park and two at Lauzier Park. Many of the players and teams come from other cities in the area. One team from Moses Lake, for instance, the Desert Dawgs, plays in the tournament almost every year and places in the top two or three in the upper division, said Tony Mora Jr. Mora is an organizer of the tournament and a son of Tony Mora Sr., a veteran who got his family involved in softball at early ages. He died in 1989. Keeping the tournament going year after year helped the extended family stay close. “After 30 years it’s kind of a tradition,” Tony Mora Jr. said. “Family teams get together and have fun.” Players in the 2018 Tony Mora Sr. Softball Tournament enjoy fast-paced games in a family environment in Quincy parks. Photo by Dave Burgess/Post-Register The atmosphere is fun, but when it comes to winning or losing, players want to try their hardest, Mora said. First-place teams in the upper and lower division get to take home jackets. Second-place teams win T-shirts. Two MVPs are also chosen, and the top eight players get all-star T-shirts. Alongside the friendly competition are fajitas so popular they are almost as much a part of the Tony Mora Sr. weekend as home runs and high-fives. Speaking about the fajitas, Mora said, “Everybody loves to grab two or three of those and sit in the shade and enjoy the parks.” In the past, the idea of not doing the fajitas has come up, but the consensus was no, the tournament wouldn’t be the same without them. Money raised in the tournament funds a scholarship of $1,000 for a Quincy High School student. The Tony Mora Sr. Scholarship this year was given to Hunter Harrington. Players ages 16 and older are welcome to play. The cost per team is $325. To sign up a team, call Tony Mora Jr. at 509-750-1970 by Monday, June 17. “We have a good time,” Mora said. But it is a lot of work. Getting the permits, tents, concessions and fencing takes time and volunteers. At Lauzier Park fields, Mora said the family brings in about 300 feet of portable fences. They also bring in equipment to grade the diamonds. “We want to represent, so we get the fields groomed,” Mora said. With the work involved in putting a tournament together, he said, the older folks are kind of hoping younger relatives will take it on. “30 years – that’s a lot of tournaments, but we enjoy it,” he said. By Dave Burgess,...

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Martinez talks about decision to give up coaching wrestling

Posted by on Jun 11, 2019

It’s perhaps fitting that when it came time to say goodbye to his favorite sport, Greg Martinez wrestled with the decision. After all, Martinez had been wrestling almost his entire life, having joined the youth wrestling program as a grade-schooler, following in the footsteps of three older brothers, Gabe, Fred and Johnny, all three renowned grapplers. Junior high and high school wrestling came later, as did a career in coaching that started as a youth wrestling coach while he was still in high school. After he got back into town from college in the early 2000s, Martinez – by then a teacher – served as a volunteer coach, junior high coach, and assistant high school coach before replacing his mentor Manny Ybarra as head coach at Quincy High School 10 years ago. “He had a vision and knew I wanted to be a wrestling coach,” Martinez said. “We kind of thought the same way, so he felt comfortable handing the position over to me.” That decade-long coaching journey came to an end when Martinez resigned as QHS boys wrestling coach earlier this spring. “There’s never a right time,” he said. “It’s never easy.” Even after he made the decision, his wife, Abby, quizzed him. “Are you sure?” she asked. “We can wait a little bit longer.” It took Greg several months to find the courage to leave the wrestling room behind, but in truth, Martinez said the sport he loves was taking too big a toll on his family. “From December to February there’s usually three days a week that I wouldn’t see my kids,” he said. “Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday, I would wake up and go to school and would not get home until after the kids were in bed.” In addition, his career goal of someday becoming a school administrator got a big boost during the 2018-19 year. Martinez has served as dean of students in two Quincy elementary schools this year and will be the dean of students at Quincy Middle School next year. The year away from the classroom and inside an office reinforced Martinez’ belief that his career dream is on the right path. The dream has a price, and that price is hanging up the whistle. “I love working with teachers helping them solve problems, and I love working with our challenging youth to try and help them quote-unquote see the light,” Martinez said. “And it’s hard to be really good at that and be a really good head coach.” Telling his assistants was tough, as was telling athletic director Mark Kondo. Nothing was tougher, Martinez said, than telling his athletes he was done. “There was a little bit of crying, mostly on my part,” he said. In time, he will probably return to coaching, but at the youth level, to bring the program, as he said, “to what it used to be” and to help coach his son, a youth wrestler. Lastly, he wants to help complement the work of Ross Kondo at the junior high team and of Martinez’ successor at QHS. “I really believe we have the structure, the makeup and the community support in place to be a top-10 team at state routinely,” Martinez said. “We just have to make sure we have a piece in place at every...

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Former Quincy standout has strong college season

Posted by on Jun 4, 2019

The second act of Quincy grad Cody Kehl’s college baseball career looks almost nothing like its first. Recruited by Edmonds Community College, Kehl saw little of the good times he envisioned with the Tritons, and he transferred out. “The coaches were really arrogant,” Kehl said. Now with Columbia Basin College, the infielder’s freshman season saw him put up the kind of statistics that have him dreaming of more success with the Hawks next year. Cody Kehl in 2017 Kehl batted .405 in conference play, posting a .505 on-base percentage, the latter stat aided by having 27 walks on the year. He had 49 singles, 11 runs batted in and nine doubles, striking out only nine times and stealing nine bases. He earned a spot in the Northwest Athletic Conference’s All-Star Game, the All-NWAC second team, and the NWAC’s All-East Region’s first team. Lastly, he won the award for CBC athlete of the month for April. Overall, his freshman season’s batting average was .395. The team took second at its cross-regional tournament, losing their final game by one run to Mount Hood, 5-4, and missing out on the NWAC championship tournament. Kehl credits a strong team chemistry for the Hawks’ high division ranking and record of 18-10 in league and 25-19 overall. Such chemistry was among the items missing in Kehl’s baseball experience at Edmonds, which led him to transfer and move east. Kehl said he was one of four players to transfer out of Edmonds during his first college winter break. Transfer rules required him to sit out a season at CBC last year, but he practiced with the team and got to know his teammates. He has played against Edmonds twice. In the first game, he got walked three times in a 10-3 loss. The second time, the Hawks lost in a pitcher’s duel, 2-1, with Kehl going 1-for-3. “It was definitely fun to play against those guys,” Kehl said. Kehl added that he adapted well to the faster college game, saying that when facing stronger pitching, the competitor in himself took over and motivated him to take his game up a notch. That seems to be the game plan next year as well, with Kehl seeking to earn East Region Player of the Year honors next season. He finished three votes shy of this year’s winner, Yakima Valley’s Matt James. By Sebastian Moraga, For the...

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Quincy closes season with state tennis appearance

Posted by on May 31, 2019

Quincy High School’s tennis team finished its 2019 season with a trip to the state tournament in Seattle May 24-25. The trip did not have the ending of past years, with Quincy players placing among the top eight. This time around, neither Louis Merred nor Efrem Roseburg placed in the boys singles’ bracket, but the experience was a positive one for both Jacks fuzz-peelers. It did not start that way, coach Matthew See said, with both players putting up subpar performances in their first round matches. “I’m always really honest with our kids, and I don’t sugarcoat a whole lot,” See said, later adding that the first-round performances were among the worst of the season for Merred a state returner, and Roseburg, a first-timer. Roseburg lost to White River’s Jared Zaugg, 1-6, 1-6, and Merred lost to Anacortes’ Luke Rutz, 1-6, 2-6. A combination of nerves mixed with the oddity of playing indoors hurt the Quincy players, See said. “You feel like you are on a giant stage, with everybody looking down at ya,” See said. “It can be really intimidating.” He then added, “It’s state, so everybody is good.” Zaugg finished seventh in state, and Rutz went on to finish sixth. Roseburg and Merred played a lot better in the second match. Roseburg lost to Foss’ Jake Martin, an eventual fifth-place finisher, 2-6, 2-6. Merred defeated Centralia’s Ryan Mack, 6-1, 6-4. If Roseburg had beaten Foss, his next opponent would look quite familiar. “It would have been a big bummer,” See said of having Merred and Roseburg play each other in a loser-out match if they had both won their second matches. “It would have been a battle, but a good battle.” As it turned out, Merred instead played Martin, who defeated the senior from Quincy, 1-6, 2-6, ending the Jacks’ tourney. “I know they would have liked to do better, but at the same time, I know they were both overall happy with the fact that they made it (to state),” See said. The state title went to Shane Lynette of Bellingham’s Sehome High School, one of the great storylines of the tournament. On the last match of his prep career, the senior and four-time state finalist went home a winner at last. Third place went to Masato Kuroshima, of Ephrata. Quincy will unveil eight brand-new courts next spring at the new high school. With courts at the new QHS, the old QHS and Lauzier Park, the prospect of hosting bigger tournaments may become a reality for the Jacks, See said, and not just during the season or post-season. “One tournament I would love to do one day would be called the Quincy Ones or something,” he said. “It would be an invite for all the schools around Central Washington to bring in their No. 1 guys and girls, singles and doubles. That would be a great way to get some of those best kids some great competition.” By Sebastian Moraga, For the...

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QHS vaulter Moloso finishes eighth at state track and field

Posted by on May 31, 2019

The Jacks’ pole vaulter Trevor Moloso finished in eighth place at the state championship meet in Tacoma on Saturday. Moloso topped out at 12 feet, six inches, while second-place finisher Judeah Sanders of Woodland hit 13 feet, the same mark Moloso had two weekends ago at regionals. “He would have liked to have done a little bit better, but he was happy” Coach Jon Barker said of Moloso. The unfamiliar surroundings, mixed with the rain and cold of Tacoma, plus the odd placing of the pole vault runway in the middle of the football field conspired against a better results. Nevertheless, Moloso had the best mark of any 2A pole vaulter from east of the Cascades in the finals. In addition, Israel Cavazos competed in the 100 meters, and Bryn Heikes and Jane Kennedy competed in the 800 meters. None advanced past the state preliminaries, but they all have at least one more year of prep sports to go. Moloso was the only senior in the Quincy delegation. Cavazos competed in the 100 meters, finishing in 18th place in prelims with a time of 11.80 seconds. The top eight moved on to the finals. Heikes, a junior, finished 11th in the 800-meter prelims, with a time of two minutes, 24.97 seconds. Kennedy finished 16th with a time of 2:32.03 minutes. “They all took it as a really positive, constructive opportunity,” Barker said of his three non-seniors competing at state. “A great learning experience.” That was especially true of Cavazos, who had to go up against athletes putting up nationally qualified marks, Barker said. This was the last state tournament for Barker, who resigned as head coach of boys track and field earlier this month. Before closing the book on his season, he offered some parting words for the younger athletes wanting to make it to state in the years to come. “Focus and dedication out of season,” he said. “There are some kids who think they can just show up and only start trying when it’s too late in the season. They don’t lift weights or work on their agility during the offseason, (while) Israel spends a lot of time in the weight room, Bryn and Jane run a lot on their own, and Trevor plays other sports and goes to pole-vault camps.” With a new school opening this summer come some new digs for the track team, which might host districts and/or regionals next season. “We have great people to help in our meets,” Barker said. “We have a great community that supports track and field.” This season it was the first time in recent memory that a university and not a school hosted district and regionals (CWU) and not everybody was pleased with the result. “It was a learning experience for the league,” Barker said. “A lot of frustration getting people there and learning which timing system we were going to use.” By Sebastian Moraga, For the...

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Sarty among best golfers at state

Posted by on May 30, 2019

Quincy High School golfer Stacia Sarty finished 19th among the 40 finalists at the 2A Girls Golf State Tournament in Liberty Lake on May 22. Sarty finished 19th in the preliminary round the day before, shooting a 43 in the front nine and a 46 in the back nine, for a total score of 89. The top 40 golfers moved on to the finals, where Sarty played even better, shooting an 88. “It’s great,” Quincy head girls golf coach Pat McGuire said, noting that in one year’s time, Sarty had gone from qualifying for state but not advancing to the final round last year to finishing among the top 20 golfers in 2A this year. McGuire noted that Sarty had shot a 97 in practice rounds before the round of state, which would not be enough to advance if the cutoff was placed at 95. “All of a sudden, she elevated her game as far as her contact with the driver and the fairway woods and her irons; it was absolutely spectacular. From tee to greens, she was as good as anybody out there.” She struggled with her putter, but that was the only flaw that set her back and kept her from a better finish. “I don’t think the scores equate to how well she played,” McGuire. She could have easily shot in the low 80s if her putter had cooperated, he added. Sarty was one of three golfers at Liberty Lake’s Meadowwood Golf Course to hail from the Central Washington Athletic Conference and finish in the top 20. Best of the bunch was the new state champion, Ellensburg’s Kathryn Crimp, who shot a first-round 75 and a second-round 71 to take the title. Morgan Baum of East Valley-Yakima finished ninth with a 164 (84-80) score. Four more CWAC golfers, three from Ephrata and one from Ellensburg, also made the cut to go on to the finals. Another CWAC golfer, Quincy’s own Mackenzie Kleyn, made her state debut, shooting a 52 in the front nine and 51 in the back for a final score of 103 in the first round of the big dance. “She played well,” McGuire wrote in a text message. On the boys’ side, Nate Gonzalez qualified for state as an alternate, but did not get to play. By Sebastian Moraga, For the Post-Register Stacia...

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Time for ‘Sergio’ aka ‘Pedro’ to hit the road

Posted by on May 27, 2019

Readers call me Sergio, coworkers call me Pedro, my mom calls me Oscar. Regardless of the name, make sure to call me grateful for the three years and 19 days I have spent as the sports editor for the Quincy Valley Post-Register. A tenure that will have reached its end by the time you read this column. I will miss Quincy a lot. Freelancing for this paper will help some, but it will also serve as a reminder of all the great times I had here. Like when I got stuck in a Jaycee Stadium bathroom during a football game, or when I thought a praying lady at church with her arms up was just waiting for a high-five, or when I called a Wenatchee-Quincy soccer game for a Wenatchee TV station at Wenatchee’s Apple Bowl, Quincy scored first and I went bananas. ‘GOOAALLLLLLLL!!!” Then I remembered where I was. Later that year, Quincy played Chelan, and Quincy scored first. Once again, I lost it, just long enough to forget that the Chelan coach’s husband was next to me. I will never forget last Halloween, when it was my job to distribute candy to trick-or-treaters at the office, dressed as a gorilla. That gorilla mask was so warm that sweat started pouring off me, and with no place to go, it started dripping from the mask’s nostrils. Grossed out and all, the kids still took the candy. Then, last year I decided to cook hotdogs outside. The briquettes refused to light up, so I had to find some paper and the only paper I had handy were copies of my own articles in the trunk. Oh well. And speaking of food, I was a judge at last year’s FCAD cooking contest. After 21 dishes, I was in a food coma when I drove to the office. I collapsed into my chair and thought, “nap time,” since it was a Saturday. I closed my eyes and leaned back. Zzzzzzz. That’s when the boss walked in. But the story I will treasure the most happened in a cold Quincy day of spring sports, when the weather had turned so unfriendly that I could not resist following the team into the locker room at halftime. The players just stared at me, wondering what on earth I was doing in the most sacred of sporting spaces, where journalists are only welcome at the end of contests, not halfway through. I had no business being there, so I fessed up: “I’m sorry,” I said. “It’s just that I’m really cold.” On the way back out, I apologized again, this time to the head coach, Arturo Guerrero. “Sorry, coach, I was just really cold.” Guerrero patted me on the back and said, “Don’t worry Sebastián, you’re a part of the family.” And as with every family, sometimes we have to say our good-byes, and now it’s my turn. Until we cross paths again, my deepest gratitude to all of you for helping me feed my own family doing something I love in a community I will always love. Thank you, Quincy, for letting me be part of your family. By Sebastian Moraga,...

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Quincy’s young athletes shine at annual Junior Olympics

Posted by on May 25, 2019

The annual Junior Olympics returned last weekend with dozens of middle-school athletes sweating under the Cashmere sun. Many of those athletes had Qs on their chests, and several of them managed to put up some noteworthy marks at Bulldog Field. Seventh grade boys: Sergio Castillo, first place, discus, 77 feet, 3.5 inches. Quincy relay team, first place, 4×100, 53.9 seconds. Jayden Richards, third place, 200 meters, 27.3 seconds. Ethan Grigg, third place, triple jump, 28 feet, 4.5 inches. Wyatt Keller, fourth place, triple jump, 27 feet, 4.5 inches. Ethan Grigg, fifth place, 400 meters, 1:7.2 minutes. Sergio Castillo, sixth place, shot put, 24 feet, seven inches. Cody Kennedy, seventh place, 400 meters, 1:12 minutes. Jayden Richards, seventh, 100 meters, 13.5 seconds. Robert Bensch, seventh place, shot put, 61 feet, seven inches. Seventh-grade girls Shea Heikes, first place, 100-meter hurdles, 17.9 secs. Sophia Navarro, second place, 100 meters, 14.4 seconds. Quincy relay team, second place, 4×100, 58.3 seconds. Brooke Melburn, fourth place, triple jump, 24 feet 6.5 inches. Quincy relay team, fourth place, 4×200 race, two minutes. 21.3 seconds. Sophia Navarro, fifth place, long jump, 11 feet, nine inches. Kallie Kooistra, sixth place, discus, 60 feet, eight inches. Sophia Navarro, sixth place, high jump, four feet. Brooke Melburn, ninth place, long jump, 10 feet, 10 inches. Eighth-grade girls Luz Aragon, second place, 800 meters, two minutes, 44.9 seconds. Ashley Rosas, fourth place, discus, 61 feet, 7.5 inches. Joceline Schaapman, fourth place, 100-meter hurdles, 18.3 seconds. Quincy relay team, fourth place, 4×100 race, 58.7 seconds. Quincy relay team, fifth place, 4×200 race, two minutes. 16.8 seconds. Guadalupe Valladolid, fifth place, discus, 53 feet, six inches. Olivia Rigby, sixth place, 200 meters, 30.1 seconds. Joceline Schaapman, seventh place, high jump, four feet. Reese Nieuwenhuis, seventh place, triple jump, 23 feet, eight inches. Joceline Schaapman, eighth place, 22 feet, 7.5 inches. Dulce Bautista, eighth place, long jump, 10 feet, 10 inches. Guadalupe Valladolid, ninth place, shot put, 20 feet, 8.25 inches. Guadalupe Valladolid, ninth place, javelin, 56 feet, 10 inches. Marisol Uribe, ninth place, high jump, three feet, nine inches. Marisol Uribe, 10th place, long jump, 10 feet, five inches. Eighth-grade boys: Edgar Guzman, first place, 1,600 meters. Four minutes, 55.3 seconds, almost 10 seconds ahead of second-place finisher Juan David Martinez of Brewster. Edgar Guzman, first place, 800 meters. Two minutes, 19.5 seconds. Kenny Thompson, first place, pole vault, 10 feet, six inches. Quincy relay team, first place, 4×100, 49 seconds. Kenny Thompson, second place, long jump, 15 feet, 7.5 inches. Rodrigo Cipriano, second place, triple jump, 32 feet, 1.25 inches. Quincy relay team, 4×100 throwers relay, third place, one minute, 0.1 seconds. David Medina, third place, javelin, 112 feet, seven inches. Edgar Guzman, third place, long jump, 15 feet, four inches. Preston Simmons, fourth place, pole vault, seven feet, five inches. Harrison Hyer, fourth place, triple jump, 30 feet, 3.5 inches. Quincy’s relay team, fourth place, 4×200, one minute, 52.9 seconds. Trenten Calloway, fourth place, 1,600 meters, five minutes, 25.9 seconds. Edwin Esparza, fifth place, discus, 98 feet, three inches. David Medina, fifth place, shot put, 33 feet, 6.5 inches. David Medina, seventh place, discus, 92 feet, two inches. Trenten Calloway, seventh place, 800 meters, 2:33.9 minutes. By Sebastian Moraga,...

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Several Quincy athletes earn all-conference honors for spring sports

Posted by on May 24, 2019

Quincy High School athletes made a name for themselves this spring season as evidenced by all the recognition they earned from the Central Washington Athletic Conference. In girls golf, Stacia Sarty earned first-team all-conference honors as a junior, one of only two non-seniors to earn the honor. She qualified for state. In tennis, Louis Merred earned first-team all-conference honors among male players, and teammate Efrem Roseburg earned an honorable mention. Both qualified for state. Lastly, the boys team won the conference’s sportsmanship award. In boys golf, Nate Gonzalez earned second-team all-conference honors, and the team won the conference’s sportsmanship award. In track and field, Jane Kennedy earned second-team all-conference honors among female distance runners. Trevor Moloso earned second-team honors among vertical jumpers. Both Kennedy and Moloso made state. Taylor Thomsen earned an honorable mention among female throwers. Jalen Spence earned an honorable mention among hurdlers, and the entire boys team earned the Sportsmanship Award, shared with Prosser. In softball, Mia Ramirez, a sophomore, earned an honorable mention. In baseball, Nick Gonzalez earned an honorable mention. The baseball team’s first-year skipper Colton Loomis earned Coach of the Year honors. In boys soccer, Jose Lopez earned second-team all-conference honors among defenders. Saul Buenrostro earned second-team honors as a midfielder, while Adrian Borja earned an honorable mention as a forward and Hector Dominguez capped a breakout season with an honorable-mention nod as a midfielder. By Sebastian Moraga,...

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Brett Fancher selected as next athletic director

Posted by on May 24, 2019

Brett Fancher, an Oroville man with Quincy ties (and neckties) will become the next athletic director of Quincy High School. Fancher was chosen out of a pool of three finalists, which included Scott Carr, of Moses Lake, and Drew Edgerly, of Fremont, Calif. He will replace Kaycie Tuttle, the school’s titular AD, and Mark Kondo, the associate AD who filled in for Tuttle after she became ill. “Mr. Fancher excelled in every aspect of the selection process,” Quincy School District Superintendent John Boyd said in a press release. “(QHS Principal) Dr. (Marcus) Pimpleton and I feel he is the right person to support our athletes and coaches to great success.” In the same release, Fancher, the former athletic director at Oroville, said he was excited to join the school district of Quincy, which is where his wife grew up. “My wife, Michele and I are excited to be moving to Quincy to join the Quincy School District team,” Fancher said. “When we had the opportunity to meet the community, we were impressed with the outpouring of support we saw for Quincy schools. We look forward to meeting everybody, and can’t wait to get to work.” The following are excerpts of an interview with Fancher during a meet-and-greet he and the two other finalists had with the Quincy community in early May. On what attracted him to the job: “When you see a community willing to make this kind of investment, with the bond issue, the facilities, with creating an athletic-director position that is just an athletic director, that means that Quincy means business. “That was a super big opportunity for me to lead an athletic department like this.” On what he will expect of coaches as AD: “I’m gonna expect my coaches to be actively working with all grade levels. “My vision is to have high school coaches involved with middle-level coaches, attending their games and being involved with the youth level.” On how to build a pipeline of talent from youth level to high school level: “It takes communication, it takes trust, it takes building relationships with people and being able to communicate my vision. “(The vision is something that states) ‘this is what we are here for and what we want to see.’ I’d like to say to parents of young kids: Don’t wait until your kids are of junior-high or high-school age before you get involved. In order to have a strong program, it really needs to start before your kids get involved.” On how to achieve a better student-athlete balance: “When students come to me and say, ‘I’m going to not play sports so I can focus on my grades,’ that is a huge misconception. “Being in sports teaches time management, it teaches self-discipline and it adds another adult to oversee what’s in the best interest of the kid. The research is clear, being involved in sports reduces dropout rates.” On how an athletic director can help build a winner in Quincy: There’s a level of accountability that the AD needs to hold himself to, and then hold the coaches to. “Spending a lot of time in practice and seeing how coaches coach, and fostering within coaches the idea of continued growth, going to coaches clinics. “Whatever solution is out there, we will find them....

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